Using ARIA in HTML

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ARIA (WAI-ARIA if you want to be formal) is a set of attributes that you can add to HTML elements. These attributes communicate role, state and property semantics to assistive technologies via the accessibility APIs implemented in browsers. The W3C HTML specification provides information about which ARIA attributes are allowed to be used on each […]

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HTML5 Element Index

Head

Sections

Grouping

Tables

Forms

Forms 2

Interactive

Edits

Embedded

Text-level

Text-level 2

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