Archive for the ‘Elements’ Category

The abbr element

The <abbr> element is not new to HTML5, nor has it been redefined. The HTML5 spec has, however, removed the <acronym> element, which was (and is) common in HTML 4 web pages. Simply put, instead of using <acronym>, use <abbr>.

video + canvas = magic

You’ve already learned about the <video> and <canvas> elements, but did you know that they were designed to be used together? In fact, the two elements are absolutely wondrous when you combine them together. I’m going to show off a few super-simple demos using the two elements together, which should help suggest cool future projects for you fellow web authors.

HTML5 Simplequiz #2: citing people

A few years ago, Dan Cederholm published a series of articles called Simplequiz in which he posed some options for marking up a specified piece of content and invited readers to choose the one they felt was the best way to mark that up. The value was in the comments in which people said why they made that choice and debated the options (which means it is THE LAW that you read the preceeding comments before adding your own).

An introduction to the Canvas 2D API

If the video element is the poster boy of HTML5, then canvas is definitely Danny Zuko. The canvas element is (still) part of the HTML5 specification, but the 2D drawing API has been moved into a separate document (in case you go looking and can’t find it).

You can still use div

“Sorry, can you say that again?”, I hear you ask. Certainly: you can still use <div>! Despite HTML5 bringing us new elements like <article>, <section>, and <aside>, the <div> element still has its place. Let the HTML5 Doctor tell you why.

The dl element

The <dl> element existed in HTML 4, but it’s been repurposed in HTML5. Let the Doctor explain what’s changed and how it can be used.

The article element

We’ve discussed a lot of new elements here at HTML5Doctor, but the article element has somehow escaped the microscope… until now! article is one of the new sectioning elements. It is often confused with section and div but don’t worry we’ll explain the difference between them.

The ruby element and her hawt friends, rt and rp

The <ruby>, <rt> and <rp> elements allow us to add ‘ruby’ phonetic annotations in languages like Japanese and Chinese. Despite the terrors of internationalisation and patchy browser support — with a little fiddling and a lot of caution — this sexy threesome with adorable accents are ready to use now.