Archive for the ‘Elements’ Category

An introduction to the Canvas 2D API

If the video element is the poster boy of HTML5, then canvas is definitely Danny Zuko. The canvas element is (still) part of the HTML5 specification, but the 2D drawing API has been moved into a separate document (in case you go looking and can’t find it).

You can still use div

“Sorry, can you say that again?”, I hear you ask. Certainly: you can still use <div>! Despite HTML5 bringing us new elements like <article>, <section>, and <aside>, the <div> element still has its place. Let the HTML5 Doctor tell you why.

The dl element

The <dl> element existed in HTML 4, but it’s been repurposed in HTML5. Let the Doctor explain what’s changed and how it can be used.

The article element

We’ve discussed a lot of new elements here at HTML5Doctor, but the article element has somehow escaped the microscope… until now! article is one of the new sectioning elements. It is often confused with section and div but don’t worry we’ll explain the difference between them.

The ruby element and her hawt friends, rt and rp

The <ruby>, <rt> and <rp> elements allow us to add ‘ruby’ phonetic annotations in languages like Japanese and Chinese. Despite the terrors of internationalisation and patchy browser support — with a little fiddling and a lot of caution — this sexy threesome with adorable accents are ready to use now.

The figure & figcaption elements

In traditional printed material like books and magazines, an image, chart, or code example would be accompanied by a caption. Before now, we didn’t have a way of semantically marking up this sort of content directly in our HTML, instead resorting to CSS class names. HTML5 hopes to solve that problem by introducing the <figure> and <figcaption> elements. Let’s explore!

The nsfw element

Among the new semantic elements for section, footer, header and the like, HTML5 also adds an element that can contain any other element and describes it as Not Safe For Work (commonly abbreviated to “nsfw”).

The hgroup element

One of the new elements defined in HTML5 is <hgroup>, used for grouping titles with their associated subtitles. But why do we need <hgroup> when we’ve already got the <header> element? In this article, we’ll do our best to answer that question.