Archive for the ‘Specification Changes’ Category

HTML5 adaptive images: end of round one

After The Great Vendor Prefix Hullaballoo of April 2012 comes The Great Responsive Images Brouhaha of May 2012. We look at the main competing formats for adding adaptive images to HTML – the <picture> element, and the <img srcset=""> attribute.

Goodbye time, datetime, and pubdate. Hello data and value.

While HTML5 is stable and being implemented we’re still not past losing (or gaining) an element, as demonstrated by the removal of <time> and the addition of <data>. Rather than jumping into the ensuing brouhaha, we’ve spent some time figuring out what this really means. In short? Well… it’s complicated.

The return of the u element

The <u> element was deprecated in HTML 4 and non-conforming in HTML5, but a couple of use cases have seen it return from the dead. Are the use cases enough to persuade you that it’s a phoenix not a zombie?

The hgroup hokey cokey

As you may well have heard this week, hgroup has been in, out and in the spec again, while members of the W3C and others have truly been shaking it all about. If you’ve missed this latest merry dance then please head on over to the W3 bug report page to help get a clearer indication.

HTML5 for Web Developers

While they’re essential reading material for our job, W3C specifications tend to make for poor reading material. One intrepid developer set out to change this for himself — “HTML5 for Web Developers” is the fruit of his labours. In addition to introducing this awesome new resource, we make a delicious fruit salad for you by comparing it to the other HTML(5) specs.

HTML as a Living Standard — For and Against

Recently Ian Hickson, editor of the HTML5 specification, announced that HTML is the new HTML5, meaning that the WHATWG will drop the numeral “5” and just call their spec “HTML”. Giant brains John Foliot and Bruce Lawson engage in an intellectual clash of the titans over whether or not you should care.

The Footer Element Update

When I wrote the previous version of this article a few months ago, I knew, as I’m sure many of you also knew, that this element in particular would be subject to change as the HTML5 spec neared it’s completion. The problem was simple, the footer element just didn’t feel 'complete', it just didn’t offer the same flexibility as other elements. Now that’s changed.

September HTML5 spec changes

September being one month before the HTML5 spec goes to last call in October, there’s been a few significant changes to the HTML5 spec that we wanted to briefly share with our patients.